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Creating your Will
An excellent, easy-to-use way of making your Will. I found it very helpful from start to finish.
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Creating your Will



What should be included in a Will?
It should also make provision for all matters which the testator wishes to take effect after his or her death and may contain provisions aimed at mitigating the estate’s liability to tax.
Appointing guardians in your Will
If you have children under the age of 18 you will probably want to appoint a guardian to look after them in the event that you die before they reach the age of 18.
Appointing executors in your Will
If you are making a will you will probably want to appoint executors to deal with your estate upon your death.
Appointing beneficiaries to your Will
By making a will you have the opportunity to ensure that your “assets” (property, money or belongings that you own) are inherited by your chosen beneficiaries when you die.
Leaving assets in your Will
By making a will you have the opportunity to ensure that your “assets” (property, money or belongings that you own) are inherited by your chosen beneficiaries when you die.
Specifying funeral wishes in your Will
Often people include a paragraph in their will specifying how they would like their funeral to be conducted.
Leaving your body to medical science
If you want to donate your body for anatomical examination and research ideally you should make the arrangements before you die as it is normally necessary for a donor to give their consent.
Leaving your organs in your Will
If you want to donate your organs when you die ideally you should make the arrangements before you die as organs and tissues can only be removed from a deceased person with consent.
What are my options for a burial?
If you make a will you will have the opportunity to specify any funeral wishes you may have in your will.
Leaving a business in your Will
If you are a sole trader and you want to pass on the business to another person in the event that you die it is a good idea to make a will. By making a will you will have the opportunity to ensure that the business passes to those whom you would like to take over the running of the business.
Leaving gifts to charities in a Will
If you wish to make a gift to a charity when you die it is vital that you make a will. Most charities rely heavily on gifts received from their supporters when they die. Without such gifts many charities simply wouldn’t exist.
Specifying a 'right to live' in your Will
A “life interest” is where a person is given an interest in a property and/or other assets for life or for a shorter period of time. When that interest ends the interest “reverts” (passes) to other specified persons.
Including future beneficiaries in your Will
By making a will you have the opportunity to ensure that your estate is dealt with and distributed in accordance with your wishes upon your death and to ensure that any children you may have are looked after by those whom you would entrust with their care
Leaving pets in your Will
The law treats pets as property and there is, therefore, no reason why you should not make provision for them in your will. By making provision for your pets in your will you will have the opportunity to ensure that your wishes are carried out in the event of your death and that your pets are properly looked after.
Imposing conditions in your will
When making a will you may wish to impose conditions upon the gifts you make to the beneficiaries to your will. However, some types of conditions imposed may be void, may fail to take effect, or a beneficiary may be excused from complying with the condition. This article looks at some of the issues which can arise when imposing conditions.
Basic structure of a Will
The complexity of a will, in any particular case, will depend on the nature of the “testator’s” (the person whose will it is. A female is known as a “testatrix”) “estate” (the property and assets) and their personal circumstances.
Joint and Mutual Wills
A joint will is a will made by two or more “testators” (the persons who make the will) contained in a single document. Mutual wills are wills where two or more testators make separate wills or make a joint will and in doing so agree to confer on each other reciprocal benefits or agree to confer benefits on the same beneficiaries.
Signing your Will
For a will to be valid it must normally be signed by the testator (the person whose will it is). If the will is not signed the will is likely to be invalid. If the will is invalid upon the death of the testator his or her assets may be distributed other than in accordance with his or her wishes.
Witnessing your Will
For a will to be valid it must ordinarily be signed by the testator (the person whose will it is) and the testator’s signature must be witnessed by 2 or more witnesses present at the same time. If the testator’s signature is not witnessed the will is likely to be invalid.
Storing your will
Having made your will the question arises as to where it should be kept. There may be many years between you making your will and dying and it is important that it can be easily located by your loved ones after your death.

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Single Will or Mirror Wills?

If you are a couple and wish to leave all your assets to each other then you could save money by making  Mirror Wills. You can also use Mirror Wills if you whish to leave your estate to the same beneficiaries. 
 
If you wish to leave different legacies, appoint different executors or you would like to specify individual funeral wishes then you will need to make two Single Wills.
single will mirror will